The Happy Home Cook: Judy Ann Santos’ Sinigang na Munggo

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 Sinigang na Munggo (Photo by Raymund Isaac. reposted with permission from Anvil Publishing)

Sinigang na Munggo (Photo by Raymund Isaac. reposted with permission from Anvil Publishing)

When Typhoon Ondoy badly hit our country in 2009, I was inspired to do my share to help by preparing hot meals and packing relief items for our kababayans who were affected by the calamity. I was cooking ginisang munggo when my friend Mylene Dizon suggested that I add sinigang mix for a different taste. Somehow the sourness gave the dish a thicker, heartier flavor. So even if you can’t have pork or beef in your meal, the sinigang na munggo will turn out to be just as satisfying and filling.

Makes 4 to 6 servings

Ingredients

¼ kg mung beans or munggo, soaked overnight, liquid drained
3 cups water
2 tablespoons canola oil
6 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium-size onion, chopped
2 medium-size tomatoes, diced
1 cup fresh tamarind stock
Fish sauce and freshly ground pepper, to taste
1 piece long green chili or siling haba
Sinigang mix, to taste
1 cup malunggay (moringa) leaves or kangkong (water spinach) leaves, stalks removed
Chicaron (pork cracklings), for topping

Directions

  1. In a pot, boil the munggo until tender. As the beans tend to absorb water, add just enough water to cover the beans while boiling. Strain liquid and set aside.
  2. In a pan, heat oil and saute garlic, onion and tomatoes. Saute until tomatoes are soft and chopped onions are translucent.
  3. Add cooked munggo and tamarind stock.
  4. Season with fish sauce and pepper. Thrown in siling haba. Add sinigang mix according to taste. Thrown in malunggay or kangkong leaves. Stir and simmer for 2 to 3 minutes.
  5. Top with chicharon.

Fresh Tamarind Stock
(Note: We checked with Judy Ann. In case you can’t get fresh tamarind in your area, just use the sinigang na sampalok mix.)

Handful of fresh unripe tamarind (about 100-200 grams)
6 cups water

  1. Clean the tamarind. Place in a pot with water and boil until tender.
  2. Once tender, put tamarind in a sieve and mash lightly. Pour the water used to boil the tamarind on the fruit as you continue mashing it.
  3. Strain the water or tamarind stock again, making sure the juice is clear.
  4. Makes around 6 cups of stock.
 "Judy Ann's Kitchen" (Photo by Raymund Isaac. Reposted with permission from Anvil Publishing)

"Judy Ann's Kitchen" (Photo by Raymund Isaac. Reposted with permission from Anvil Publishing)