The Happy Home Cook: Adobong Malutong (Adobo Flakes)

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 Adobong Malutong (Source: Kulinarya: A Guidebook to Philippine Cuisine, Expanded Second Edition (Anvil Publishing Inc., 2013))

Adobong Malutong (Source: Kulinarya: A Guidebook to Philippine Cuisine, Expanded Second Edition (Anvil Publishing Inc., 2013))

Filipinos like to eat a dish in tandem with another. These crispy adobo flakes are sometimes paired with kare-kare [ox tail stewed in peanut sauce]. They are also good with sinangag [fried rice] or as a topping for arroz caldo [chicken rice soup] eaten on cold, rainy days. Adobong malutong has a long shelf life, especially when refrigerated in a sealed container.

Serves 6

Ingredients

1 recipe chicken and pork adobo [pre-cooked]

4 cups or 1 liter cooking oil

Preparation

1. Cool the chicken and pork adobo to room temperature.

2. Shred meat. Discard any chicken bones.

Cooking

1. In a preheated deep wok or pan, fry half the adobo flakes in oil until golden brown. A good sign that the flakes are done is when the oil has settled and has stopped bubbling.

2. Once cooked, remove flakes from the pan with the use of a strainer and place in a wire basket lined with paper towels. Repeat the frying with the remaining adobo flakes.

Serving suggestion

Adobong malutong can be eaten with friend eggs and fried rice (sinangag) for breakfast.

It is also eaten as a filling for pan de sal or paired with kare-kare.

Tips

It is common for leftovers to resurrect as a new dish in Filipino cooking. This adobo version can be made from leftover chicken and pork adobo. But for fans, it is made right after cooling down from its first adobo cooking. 

It is easy to overcook the flakes because of the hot oil. Watch the pan for the moment when the flakes turn golden brown. Cook in small batches and remove immediately, making sure that there are no stray flakes remaining, otherwise these will burn as soon as the new batch is put in. 

From Kulinarya: A Guidebook to Philippine Cuisine, Expanded Second Edition (Anvil Publishing Inc., 2013)

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